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Search HomeworkSpot or Google |   Great Must-See sites   |   Read Articles and Tips | Find answers | Did you know?  
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HomeworkSpot > Natural Disasters



Natural Disasters

When a tidal wave destroyed coastal villages or earthquakes toppled towns in ancient times, people believed the gods and goddesses were angry. Natural disasters remain mysterious and unpredictable.

Tornadoes, tsunamis and other "acts of God" provide an endless source of fascination. Whether you're creating a science project or preparing for a future career as a storm chaser, you'll find tons of information on the Web.

Elementary students should check out The Disaster Area, a fun site from the Federal Emergency Management Agency that is packed with information on tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis and more. Find facts, explode myths and play games to test your disaster IQ.




Earthquakes

The U.S. Geological Survey offers great Earthquake Information. Click to the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake to see the seismographic record, read eyewitness accounts and view photographs. Get ideas for projects at Seismology at the Science Fair, which provides an inspiring list of topics. At Space.com, learn how satellites are used to find earthquake faults.

Volcanoes

Elementary students should jump on the Volcano Field Trip, a great tour of the volcano world. For more information, go to Dangerous Planet's Interesting Facts About Volcanoes.

Older students will find great information at the U.S. Geological Survey site. Delve into a study of plate tectonics, take a tour of Volcanoes around the World or visit the Cascades Volcano Observatory, home of Mount St.Helens.

Tornadoes

The Tornado Project Online is a great starting point for researching twisters. You'll find the facts, myths, stories and science of this amazing natural phenomena. Also check out USA Today's Tornado Information site, a mini encyclopedia on the subject.

Hurricanes

Good sites on Hurricanes are blowin' around out there, too. The Fema Hurricane site explains how these mighty storms are tracked and has a lot of fun games to play. The Tropical Prediction Center's National Hurricane Center offers satellite images and information on current storms.

Tsunamis

Last, but by no means least, the tsunami is an awesome and powerfully disastrous phenomena. Go to the Pacific Tsunami Museum's FAQ for a great introduction. Washington University's site Tsunami! includes links to current research on tsunamis, statistics and more technical research.

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